As the new year rolls on and people consider the resolutions they have already broken, we’re being flooded with advice on what to eat.

Sleeping in over the weekend is one of life’s great pleasures. Yet some of us are much better at it than others.

Sleep plays a fundamental role in the way we learn. Emerging evidence makes a compelling case for the importance of sleep for language learning, memory, executive function, problem solving and behaviour during childhood.

Australian children are among the youngest users of the internet in the world, starting as young as eight years old.

Whether they’re using mobile phones, iPads or the TV, most children and teenagers will use their devices daily to chat to their friends or to access entertainment and education.

I have some good news for you: happiness is contagious and affects the happiness of others with whom you are connected.

Nelson Mandela’s life and writings reveal his fascination with education. The late statesman’s autobiography, Long Walk to Freedom, often profiles characters by their education and what he learnt from them.

How marketers condition us to buy more junk food

Fast food giant McDonald’s has been under a cloud in recent years as its US customers turn to alternatives. In this “Fast food reinvented” series we explore what the sector is doing to keep customers hooked and sales rising.

What we think others do, and what we think they approve of, are factors that have an important influence on our own behaviour.

Sleep is an essential part of our development and wellbeing. It is important for learning and memory, emotions and behaviours, and our health more generally.

The Low-Down on Standing Desks

Sitting, it’s becoming fashionable to note, is the “new smoking”. Sedentary behaviour dominates modern life, just as smoking did some decades ago.